Tailored LED low bay light installation for Sydney Uni IEQ lab

Released: 17-Feb-2014
LED high bay light installation at Sydney Uni IEQ lab

The Indoor Environment Quality (IEQ) Laboratory at the University of Sydney's Faculty of Architecture, Design & Planning opened in late 2012 with a charter to examine how the key IEQ factors - temperature, humidity, air movement, ventilation rates, air quality, daylight, artificial lighting, sound and acoustics – all interact to determine comfort, productivity and health outcomes for occupants.

Enlighten Australia is pleased to support the valuable research facility and met with Honorary Associate, Mr Ashak Nathwani, former Director of building services firm, Norman Disney Young, to design a lighting solution for "outdoor simulation corridor" within the lab. The brief was to simulate daylight by customising the high efficiency Cetus LED low bay lights, which were donated to the University.

In response to the  brief, electronics consultant  Doug Ford of Analog Design & Enlighten Australia's Engineering Manager, Gerald Grant, designed a control system that would enable a range of light level outputs and tested a variety of  LED colour temperatures (2700K -4000K) LEDs before the Sydney Uni team selected the warm white output of the 3000K Luxeon M LED.

Enlighten then developed a hardwired control module that connects the lights to the Building Management System (BMS), allowing variable light output in 10 % increments from 0-100% & controlled by DC 0-10 volts signals from the BMS.

The four low bay LED lights with 120 degree integrated lenses were ceiling mounted within the "Outdoor Simulation Corridor" which borders both chambers 1 & 2 (marked in green on the diagram below). Heaters were sourced by the University to provide the heat load onto the chamber window.

How does it work?

Researchers can examine how the key IEQ factors - temperature, humidity, air movement, ventilation rates, air quality, daylight, artificial lighting, sound and acoustics – all interact to determine comfort, productivity and health outcomes for occupants. The facility consists of two purpose-built rooms in which all of these indoor environmental parameters can be precisely controlled or precisely transitioned across a broad range of values, in any combination, while a sample of typical building occupants (subjects) go about their typical daily activities for an exposure time (usually a few hours each experiment). The subject are asked to register their subjective impressions (quality ratings) on a comfort questionnaire.

The IEQ lab’s two chambers look and feel as much as possible like normal rooms, not experimental labs, so as to maximise what environmental psychologists call “experiential realism” of the simulated indoor environments. Initially the Lab chambers’ fit-out will resemble grade-A commercial office spaces, but they’ve been specifically designed for maximum flexibility, so residential, industrial, retail, cinema/theatre, leisure facility, even vehicular (car, bus, train, plane) interiors can also be realistically simulated for modest reconfiguration costs.

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